OPFS server is the daemon that powers OPFS, the media storage system
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README.md

OPFS

OPFS - Only Pandas Feign Sarcasm

Now that could stand for something hip like Open Polymedia File System, but it would not be true. OPFS is a system for storing photos and video clips (primarily) in such a way that they can be searched, retrieved and easily backed up alongside their meta-data. I wanted to do it to keep the photo/video I have taken of my children in a platform agnostic way. So it is named after them: Orson Patrick and Florcence Scarlett.

However, Flo likes pandas and I wanted a panda logo, so the P is now for Panda(s). The rest can be made up on the spot.

OPFS runs from a single binary, and needs a config file (defaulting to: ~/.opfs/config.json) to tell it where to store data, and where to watch for new data.

It exposes an API used for the web client, and I hope at some point to be able to write a FUSE module for it so it can be accessed as a local filesystem.